One year of a beekeeper

 

January

As a beekeeper, January is a time to look back at the previous year and make plans for the coming season. It’s a good time to review beekeeping practices. January is also a great time to reach out to other beekeepers in your area to get advice and tips for the coming season.

February

If you live in a mild climate, February is a good time to start preparing your hives for the upcoming year. This includes making sure all of your equipment is in good condition, building new hives if needed, and ordering new bees if you haven’t done so already. You should also start planning your beekeeping activities for the year, such as when you plan to harvest honey and if you plan to attend any beekeeping events.

March

March is a great time to get your hives ready for the new season. This includes cleaning out any old wax and debris. You should also start feeding your bees with sugar water and pollen patties to make sure they have enough food for the upcoming season. Some beekeepers prefer to treat bees for varroa before the main season starts.

April

April is the official start of the beekeeping season. This is the time to start introducing your bees to their new hives if old ones are in bad condition. You should also start monitoring your hives for signs of disease or pests, and make sure to keep an eye out for any swarms that may occur. April is also a good time to start harvesting honey and wax if you plan to do so.

May

May is a busy time for beekeepers as the bees are in full swing and the hives are producing plenty of honey and wax. This is the time to start harvesting honey and wax, as well as inspect your hives for any signs of disease or pests. You should also keep an eye out for any swarms that may occur, and be prepared to relocate any colonies that may be in danger.

June

June is very similar to May. It is a great time to continue harvesting honey and wax. This is when the bees are at their busiest, so you should be sure to take extra care when harvesting. You should also be on the lookout for signs of disease or pests, and monitor your hives for any swarms that may occur.

July

July is a busy time for beekeepers as the bees are still in full swing and the hives are still producing plenty of honey and wax. Again, this is the time to continue harvesting honey and wax, as well as inspect your hives for any signs of disease or pests. July is typically end of harvesting season after which you bees are treated against varroa. July is a great time to change old queens for new ones if necessary.

August

August is also the time to start preparing for the winter months by making sure bees have enough honey for the winter. If not, it is time for feeding. Feeding starts right after treatment against varroa.

September

September is time for checking your hives against robberies from other bee colonies. You need to be extra careful during feeding. Colonies should have enough storage of honey for upcomming winter.

October

October is a good time to monitor your hives for signs of disease or pests again as this is usually last chance for proper treatment.

November

November is the time for merging 2 bee colonies. Otherwise there is not much to do.

December

December is a quiet time for beekeepers and not much needs to be done. This is a good time to do some maintenance and make sure all of your equipment is in good condition. You should also start thinking about your plans for the upcoming year and make sure you are ready for the start of the new beekeeping season.